Ginger: One of the 10 Most Important Herbs

Ginger is one of those herbs you don’t waimagesnt to be without.  Ginger can assist in Digestion,  help with gas, bloating and diarrhea;  plus it’s imperative for Nausea.  It’s also effective in reducing and often preventing stomach ulcers.

Smelling like a citrus heaven, it’s compounds help the body absorb and use the nutrients from other foods.  In fact, drinking a ginger tea, which is sweet, child friendly and warming, is great before any meal, but especially before a large holiday meal; Continue reading

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Celery, Sodium, Minerals and Onions-Making Your Own Seasonings

vesfmk5ylpzzgtqpmqxvI’ve left half an onion in my refrigerator more times than I can count.  I hate throwing the unused half away or letting it go to waste.  But it seems to be an unwritten rule that the next time I clean out the fridge, it’s shriveled, or forgotten at the back of the drawer.

I find it easier to chop up the whole thing, (usually the second half is just sliced since it’s quicker) and half goes in my meal at hand; the other half I immediately throw in my dehydratorMérgező-ételek-3, for 12-48 hours, depending on your humidity.  Even here in Utah, it’s usually closer to the 24-36 hour mark.

Once I’m sure it’s dry and cracks nicely, I place the dehydrated onion in my blender and powder it thoroughly.

You can do the same thing for

  • celeryraw_celery_powder
  • carrots
  • mushrooms
  • tomatoes
  • peppers
  • broccolli
  • cauliflower
  • ginger root,
  • parsley or other fresh herbs

Almost anything that you have more of, than what you need, will work and then I store them in those great little containers they have at the “dollar store”.

With celery, I keep it all, the leaves and the stalks, then dry and powder them.

Celery is  such an underrated veggie!  It’s packed with more than a dozen antioxidants (these help keep cancer causing free radicals at bay), and flavnoids (those phytonutrients that help reduce inflammation and protect our red blood cells!)  Then there’s celery’s sodium content; in a large stalk of celery (about a pound) there is nearly 400 mg of sodium.  It makes a great salt substitute, and the flavor is out of this world!IMG_20150213_145225

By drying, and even powdering your vegetables, you’ll find it’s a great way to hide all kinds of things in a soup!  (My Hubby always tells me how he hates peppers…can I just say he has no clue he’s been eating them our whole married life…:)

Use your imagination, and if the world comes to

onion pwed

a screeching halt, you’re prepared…if it doesn’t, well, you’re still prepared!

Let me know what works for you!

Lets Break Out The Sagebrush! Herbs of the Desert…

IMG_20150209_191652I love nothing more than the constant re-discovery of what an herb can do, especially one as abundant and  “commercially useless” as Sagebrush!

Known throughout the Western United States and Canada by the Native Americans, who luckily passed their knowledge of this incredible plant on to us, Sagebrush is a veritable treasure trove of helpful, lifesaving, and life enhancing goodness.

Used as a tea after childbirth, it helped control bleeding and was used for a returning warrior on his battle wounds, both externally (as a wash) and internally to address hemorrhaging.  It was seemingly used for everything at times, and considering that Sagebrush is 40% camphor, its use was likely justified.

IMG_20150209_192823Used as a decongestant, an eye wash, a wound wash (the steeped leaves placed gently over eyes) or a poultice; it was also such a powerhouse disinfectant that a decoction was used as a floor and wall wash in houses after an illness.

The list of what Sagebrush treats just goes on, malaria, bronchitis, bad colds and coughs, dandruff, hair loss, sagebrush_basin_leaves2even said to keep the hair darkened, a combination shampoo and conditioner (the flowers create a soap-like feel).  Deodorant, headache, nerves, weak legs and swellings.

Menstrual disorders, gas, indigestion, stomach disorders, foot neuralgia, moist wounds, and cholera .  And we’re just getting started!

So what are the drawbacks?  Well, there are things to be careful of.  If you have allergies to Sagebrush, you probably don’t want it on your eyes!  And like any herb, there is too much of a good thing.  While there are no toxicity reports, there have been reports of possible liver damage, and inadequate blood clotting after prolonged use.  But keep in mind, the very same can be said for something as simple as acetaminophen (aka Tylenol) or aspirin.  It’s important to learn for ourselves all that we can, and ask the advise of a medical professional if you are unsure.  Better safe than sorry is still the best course.

IMG_20150209_192429For the treatment of asthma, a poultice applied to the chest and back nightly, as well as a tea internally (for 5-10 days) can be used.

Sagebrush can be harvested in the late summer or early fall.  The parts used will be the leaves and the seeds.  Make sure when you do harvest that it comes from a source that hasn’t been treated with any chemicals, and harvest responsibly (there…I hope I covered all the bases. :))

The herb can be covered with water and allowed to soak overnight, and used as a tea the next morning, or a wash, ect.  To make a poultice you would mash up the herbs and pour boiling water over them.  Place a linen or gauze type cloth over the wound or skin with the macerated herb inside it, and wrap it for security.

As for tea, the dosages vary as widely as the herb itself, so my recommendation is start small, and see how it goes.  Maybe 4-6 oz of water with 1/4-1/2 t of herb.   You may even want to make sure you’re not allergic to it by testing a small patch of skin with a wash.

This herb takes some getting used to…yes, it’s bitter, but you can always add a little honey and see how it goes!

Let me know your experiences!

_________________________________

Any statements or claims about the possible health benefits conferred by any foods or supplements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration, healthcare professional, or even the town gossip.

They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Herbs and Wildcrafting is for educational purposes only.

DISCLAIMER:

All information and resources found on Herbs and Wildcrafting are based on the opinions of the author and are meant for educational purposes only, I hope to motivate readers to make their own nutrition and health decisions after consulting with their health care provider.

Please consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition.

No information on this site should be relied upon to determine diet, make a medical diagnosis or determine a treatment for a medical condition.

The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

No information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition.

By reading this website, you acknowledge that you are responsible for your own health decisions.

Do not take anything from any website, including this one, and try it without proper research and medical supervision. To put it bluntly,

“If you take anything you read from any web site, including this one, at face value, and then go off and try something you read about, without having appropriate safeguards and/or medical supervision and knowledge, you mayget what’s coming to you, which could include, but is not limited to: death, permanent disabilities, damage, headache, bad breath, or worse.” –Dave Asprey

I encourage you to do your own research.  Learn everything you can on any given herb or medicine, and in doing so, you will be coming from a point of knowledge rather than hoping someone else is right.  It’s always better to learn from two or three good sources, and more if you have the inclination and time.

 

 

 

Ox-Eye Daisy or Goldenseal For Muscle Spasms, Pain and So Much More

My ancestors were oxeye_ad01SDsome of those who crossed the plains in the mid 1800’s, and as I wander the trails they, and so many like them traveled, I am saddened that so many died of dysentery  and diarrhea, as they trudged past thousands upon thousands of Ox-Eye Daisys, the cure for their malady.

I hope the time may never come in my life when the very thing I need is in front of my nose, and yet I wander past it without realizing the truth.  Hence, the subject of the Ox-Eye Daisy is on my mind today.

oxeye_flo01SDMade into a tea, wash or tincture (depending on your needs), this happy flower, is a tonic, lending itself to strengthening and invigorating our bodies and minds.

As a Diuretic, it helps expels excess water through urination.

As an anti-spasmodic, it helps relieve cramping, symptoms associated with IBS, and helps relax muscle tissue, coughing, and the pain associated with it.

It often has the effect of relieving psychological tension or anxiety as well.

Generally, the entire plant, leaves, flower, and root is gathered and dried for later use as a tea, a wound wash, and was used by many Native American Tribes to relieve conjunctivitis.oxeye_leaf01SD

If you love foraging in the spring, try the young Ox-Eye Daisy leaves, they are slightly bitter and are a nice addition to a salad.

Avoid Ox-Eye or Goldenseal if you have high blood pressure, or are pregnant, because in these cases, it can further thin out your blood, or cause uterine contractions.

If you are unsure, or new to this herb, please seek the advice of a health care professional.oxeye_root01SD

This flower grows wild over most of North America and Europe.  It thrives on neglect, and can be spotted along roadway, in fields, ditches, and along fences.

It is considered a weed to eradicate by most, and is often sprayed along roadways, so be careful of your source.

They are in full flower for the harvesting around mid June to July.

I know I look forward to their arrival every year!

_______________________

Any statements or claims about the possible health benefits conferred by any foods or supplements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration, healthcare professional, or even the town gossip.

They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Herbs and Wildcrafting is for educational purposes only.

DISCLAIMER:

All information and resources found on Herbs and Wildcrafting are based on the opinions of the author and are meant for educational purposes only, I hope to motivate readers to make their own nutrition and health decisions after consulting with their health care provider.

Please consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition.

No information on this site should be relied upon to determine diet, make a medical diagnosis or determine a treatment for a medical condition.

The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice.

No information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition.